Cal Fire Suspends Burn Permits in 5 Counties Due to Increased Fire Danger

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Cal Fire has issued a burn permit suspension for areas within its jurisdiction in Napa, Solano, Lake, Yolo and Colusa counties in anticipation of increased fire danger due to the ongoing drought, warmer temperatures, a reduced snowpack and the continued threat that climate change has had on California.  

Effective Monday, all residential outdoor burning of landscaping debris such as leaves and branches will be banned within the State Responsibility Areas in the five counties.  

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Cal Fire will still be allowing and requiring permits in the State Responsibility Area in Sonoma County. Burn permits in other areas of the counties are not under the agency’s jurisdiction and are therefore not part of its ban. 

Cal Fire advises residents to pay heed to responsible use of their equipment such as mowers, weed-eaters, chainsaws, grinders, welders, tractors, trimmers or any mechanical device that could spark a wildland fire.  

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Cal Fire has repeatedly warned of an earlier-than-expected wildfire season and has already responded to more than 700 wildfires this year.  

Homeowners are also encouraged to create a 100-foot defensible space around their property as well as to put together a “go kit” with important documents and other important supplies that can be quickly grabbed if evacuations are necessary due to fire.  

Cal Fire will be making a few exceptions to burn permitting. Agriculture, land management, fire training and other industrial-type burning may proceed if a Cal Fire official inspects the burn site and issues a special permit.  

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Campfires within organized campgrounds or on private property will still be allowed but do require a permit.  

For more detailed information about wildfire prevention, go to www.readyforwildfire.org.