China’s last emperor, Eisen Guerrero Poi: a three-year-old king who wept on his ‘coronation day’

Whatever it was, their story was going to be extraordinary … He was destined to become the emperor of a state with about a quarter of the world’s population, but his fate was not the same as that of his ancestors.

The story of Eisen Guerrero Poi dates back to the 20th century. He was born in February 1906. At that time, Poi’s uncle Guangshu was the emperor of China, but Emperor Guangshu was a weak king and Poi’s aunt Queen Tashi kept him under house arrest.

Later, Queen Tashi installed Poi on the throne and ruled in her name. Despite her young age, Queen Tashi’s horrible face remained in Poi’s mind.

Years later, he wrote, “It can be said that when I first saw him, I screamed in fear. My feet were shaking. Queen Tashi asked someone to bring her sweets. I threw the sweets on the ground and shouted loudly and asked where my nanny was.

Two months before the third anniversary of the deaths of Emperor Guangzhou and Queen Tashi, Poi was proclaimed Emperor of China. Years later, Poe wrote in his autobiography, “I was weeping bitterly on the day of the coronation.”

The royal family of Poi

Poi belonged to the Manchu tribe, which defeated the Ming dynasty and founded the Chung dynasty in 1644. Under the rule of this family, the circle of China expanded and doubled. At that time, China extended from Xinjiang and Mongolia to Tibet. The current shape of China is pretty much the same.

People from different religious groups and castes had the opportunity to thrive in this new family. By the end of the 18th century, China was seen as a major economy. Its rich culture reflected its success.

The emperors of the Chung dynasty lived in magnificent palaces in the center of the capital, Beijing. He was guarded by royal security personnel. In his court, representatives of the noble families of the Manchu community used to be present.

But in the 19th century, the Chung dynasty began to weaken. The Chung dynasty was unable to defend China due to military strikes by British, American, German, French and Japanese forces.

The royal family of Poi

Poi belonged to the Manchu tribe, which defeated the Ming dynasty and founded the Chung dynasty in 1644. Under the rule of this family, the circle of China expanded and doubled. At that time, China extended from Xinjiang and Mongolia to Tibet. The current shape of China is pretty much the same.

READ MORE STORIES  Angelina Jolie's book on children's rights ready for launch

People from different religious groups and castes had the opportunity to thrive in this new family. By the end of the 18th century, China was seen as a major economy. Its rich culture reflected its success.

The emperors of the Chung dynasty lived in magnificent palaces in the center of the capital, Beijing. He was guarded by royal security personnel. In his court, representatives of the noble families of the Manchu community used to be present.

But in the 19th century, the Chung dynasty began to weaken. The Chung dynasty was unable to defend China due to military strikes by British, American, German, French and Japanese forces.

Tai Ping uprising

The Chinese Hong Shikuan, who converted to Christianity in 1850, proclaimed himself king of a new family. His supporters rallied against Chung and he received overwhelming public support.

This was followed by a civil war in China that lasted for 14 years. About 20 million people lost their lives and eventually Chinese troops had to fight European forces in the war.

The Tai Ping Uprising was a major event in 19th century Chinese history. The villagers in China’s northern provinces involved in the uprising believed that foreigners were responsible for their problems and launched a campaign to expel foreigners from China.

The revolt broke out again in 1898 and in the summer of 1900 they laid siege to Beijing, but the movement was brutally crushed in September 1901.

Decline of the Chung Dynasty

This was then China. While Poi was receiving royal upbringing, a revolution was being launched against his family. Many Chinese began to believe that the Chung dynasty had lost God’s command to rule. The revolution began in 1911.

“In one corner of the room, Empress Dova Gore was wiping her tears with a long handkerchief,” Poe wrote in her autobiography. A fat old man was sitting on his knees with them. I sat there on one side of the window. I wondered why the two big men were crying.

They were crying because the 267-year-old Chung dynasty was officially coming to an end, but six years later they were unaware of the facts.

READ MORE STORIES  Ahmed Masood refused to surrender to the Taliban

Establishment of the Republic of China

The situation remained the same until the founding of the Republic of China. Everything was new for everyone. Two thousand years of monarchy came to an end in China. No one knew what to do with the Chung family members who had been ousted.

The question was whether to send him to Manchuria or stay in Beijing.

It was decided that the kings of the Chung dynasty would be treated like foreign kings. They were allowed to live in Beijing’s Forbidden City, the “forbidden city” where the royal family lived. The royal palace, gardens and all facilities continued as before.

So not much has changed for Poi. No one felt the need to tell him that he was no longer emperor. They enjoyed the royal pleasures for a long time.

“Even when China was declared a republic and the country was progressing in the 20th century, I was living the life of an emperor,” Poe wrote.

1917

But there came a time in 1917 when Poi was re-elected emperor of China. After a successful uprising, pro-monarch General Zhang Xun declared himself the “emperor’s appointed ruler.”

But General Zhang Shun’s victory lasted only two weeks. Yes, so much so that Poi and those close to him were not blamed for the uprising.

Poi was growing up in this strange environment. They did not know what was happening in the outside world. He was separated from his family. His niece Wang was with him.

But Poi was treated as if he were a saint. No one could bother them. Even when they were mischievous, people still cared about who they were.

“It was my daily job to flog the eunuchs among my employees. My addiction to oppression and power was so strong that it didn’t matter what anyone explained.

At the age of 11

In 1919, the British scholar Reynold Johnston worked for a short time as Poi’s teacher.

“He is a playful, cheerful and intelligent boy,” he wrote to the British government. He has manners and is not proud of his power.

Gradually Pooi became a teenage boy whose rebellious nature brought him out of the Forbidden City. Poi started wearing goggles and stopped wearing the traditional Mancho top.

However, following the tradition of the emperors, they got married in a big way. “I got married four times yesterday, but the truth is they weren’t my real wives,” Poe writes. They were just for show.

READ MORE STORIES  The rate of corona cases in Karachi has gone up to 17%

Poi as the emperor of Manchu Kou

In the world outside the Forbidden City, China was still searching for answers to questions about the abolition of the monarchy, but in 1924, War Lord Feng Yuxiang came to power and Poe had to leave the Forbidden City.

At the age of 19, he took refuge with the Japanese. Japan annexed Manchuria in 1931 and made Poi the “Emperor of Manchu Kou”. Japan merged three historic provinces in northeastern China to form the province.

At the time, Japan was propagating that five Asian races were uniting under the banner of Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Manchu and Mongol Manchu Kou.

In his book The Last Emperor, Edward Behr writes that the Japanese were calling it the birth of a new civilization and a turning point in world history.

As the ‘Emperor of Manchu Kou’, Poe became a puppet of Japan. Japan was using Manchukuo to establish itself in Asia.

Imprisonment in Siberia

In Manchu Kou, Poi’s life turned into hell. The world’s most brutal system of government was then in force in Manchu Kou.

The people of Poi hated him. According to Edward Behr, Poe was a Japanese prisoner in his own palace.

As emperor, his only job was to sign everything the Japanese said.

But Poi later became a Buddhist monk. The Soviet army did not recognize him and he was taken to the Siberian city of Cheetah and once again taken prisoner, although he had more facilities than other prisoners.

Poe studied communism

In 1949, after 40 years of struggle, Mao Zedong declared a new republic in China. It was time for Poi to return home. They feared how they would be treated during Mao’s rule.

But Mao sent Poi to an educational camp. Poe spent ten years there as a common man. In 1960, Mao’s government granted Poi citizenship and independence.

The man who ruled the world’s largest population also had a time when he became a gardener in Beijing’s Botanical Gardens. In 1964, he was appointed editor of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference.

He later wrote his autobiography, From Emperor to Citizen, which was promoted by top Communist Party leaders such as Mao and Chou En-lai.